Wednesday, May 9, 2012

the skinny on skinny--memoirs of a "skinny bitch"

The other day I was running and thinking of a play I have read several times (which I LOVE) called "The Good Body" by Eve Ensler.  Like many of her plays, "The Good Body" is presented in monologue format--different women (many of them fictional but based on real stories) sharing their varied experiences with their bodies.

One monologue came to mind--a heavy, black, teen girl at fat camp named Bernice keeps comparing her self and her experience as a fat girl to what she calls, and I quote, "skinny bitches."  The monologue is hilarious, touching, raw, and delightful.

In reference to the skinny girls, the sentiment is this--that skinny girls just don't understand.

I thought about the skinny girls in my life--the ones who had been a point of envy and disdain in my adolescence.  As I was running and thinking of those girls, the questions popped into my mind, "What was THEIR experience?  What are their stories?"

I realize that I (along with many of you readers) can be the voice of a woman who has struggled with her weight, body, image,  in some sense, but not every.  I am seeing that the life of a naturally slender girl has been and is a blind spot of mine.

So.  I decided to ask my skinny friends.  Some of them have sent essays about their experiences, and some have responded to the prompt.  The prompt was to respond to this--

Skinny girls just don't understand.

Do you just not understand?  Might be something to write about there.  Or do you, in fact, understand?  OR do you understand something that us fat girls just don't/never will?

I have already received a number of awesome submissions that I will begin posting (in the order that I receive them) one-a-day(ish).  Reading through them has been such an eye-opening experience for me.  I am really excited about this series.  If you are a skinny girl and want to submit, send your story to dana.rose.fleming@gmail.com.  You can request to be anonymous or share your name.

Please read these--they are personal, moving, and pack insights I had never considered.

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